We Are Reading: Childbirth: Questions to ask your Doctor or Midwife

It is important to make an informed decision about where to deliver your baby. This article shares a list of ten great questions to ask potential settings in order to gain all the information you need. Dr. Laura Markham from Aha Parenting recommends first learning about each location and then most importantly choose the location that is best for you.

First, learn as much as you can about all your choices. There are many different ways of caring for a mother and her baby during labor and birth.

Birthing care that is healthier for mothers and babies is called “mother-friendly.” Some birth places or settings are more mother-friendly than others

Read the full list at:

http://www.ahaparenting.com/ages-stages/pregnancy/childbirth-questions-ask-doctor-or-midwife

 

Holding on: My Journey with Antidepressants.

For some people, yoga and other forms of self care are helpful when struggling with depression. For others, herbs, acupuncture, or homeopathy may help. Others benefit the most from antidepressants. At the catalyst center, we work with people to get them into the type of treatment that works best for them. That referral, along with high quality therapy, has proven to be very helpful when treating depression and anxiety.

Check out this account of author Jennifer Pastiloff’s experience treating her depression:

http://themanifeststation.net/2014/06/07/holding-on-my-journey-with-antidepressants/

Meet The Therapists: Dr. Erin Jacklin

Erin Jacklin, Psy.D., Licensed Clinical Psychologist

Dr. Jacklin’s Specialties:

Approach to Healing:

Collaborative Treatment

Dr. Jacklin’s approach focuses on working collaboratively with her clients to enrich their lives by deepening their self-understanding and transforming their interpersonal relationships.  Her clients often describe her as warm, compassionate, and genuine. She deeply believes that a significant part of what is healing about psychotherapy is the real relationship between a client and a therapist. Having someone “in your corner” who deeply understands you and genuinely wants what is best for you can be incredibly powerful. She feels honored that she gets to walk with her clients along their paths to growth and healing.

 Dr. Jacklin’s Training

Dr. Jacklin holds a PsyD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Professional Psychology, and she is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in the state of Colorado. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at Kaiser Permanente Colorado where she conducted psychotherapy and psychological assessment with individuals, couples, families, and children.

 About Dr. Jacklin

Dr. Jacklin’s family originally moved to Denver from California for her to pursue her doctorate. After falling in love with Colorado they decided to make Denver their permanent home. She feels blessed to be here in Denver and enjoys the ability to be active outdoors and explore what Colorado has to offer year-round.

We Are Reading: How To Talk To Your Children About Gender Identity

MARLO MACK

How To Talk To Your Children About Gender Identity

Marlo Mack from Mutha magazine wrote a great article about how to talk to children about gender identity. The article feels lighthearted but addresses a very important topic. We enjoyed that the author talked about how many of us likely think we have covered our bases when it comes to talking about gender and gender identity with our kids. The author also shared a personal story about her daughter.

When my son was three years old, he informed me – in no uncertain terms – that she was my daughter.  Something had gone wrong in my “tummy,” she said, which had made her come out as a boy instead of the girl she was supposed to be.  She begged me to put her back in my tummy to fix this terrible mistake.

Check out the recommendations the author makes about talking to kids.

 How to Talk to Your Kids About Gender Identity

Most people have either a penis or a vagina.  Some people have both, but that’s pretty rare.

Most people with penises feel like boys.

Most people with vaginas feel like girls.

Some people feel like boys but they really like “girl stuff.”

Some people feel like girls but they really like “boy stuff.”

Some people with penises feel like girls.  They are girls with penises. (My child falls squarely into this category.)

Some people with vaginas feel like boys.  They are boys with vaginas.

Some people are sort of “in between” and don’t feel like a boy or a girl.

All these people are normal.  All these people need to be loved and treated well, and we should respect what they tell us they are.

The “parts” that are covered up by our underpants are private.  It’s no one’s business to ask about them or talk about them.  (That goes for the parents, too!) If someone tells you she is a girl, she’s a girl. If he tells you he’s a boy, he’s a boy.  If they say they’re both, they’re both!

To read the full article go to:

 

 

 

Meet the Therapists: Dr. Courtney Klein

Courtney Klein, Psy.D., LCP

 Approach to Healing:

Lasting Positive Change

Dr. Klein specializes in working collaboratively with people who are seeking to improve their relationships and their lives. She excels at treating more than just the immediate symptoms, addressing the whole person and treating the underlying causes of distress. By using this comprehensive approach she is able to help her clients achieve lasting change rather than just a quick, temporary fix.

Dr. Klein’s clients frequently tell her that she helped them to feel comfortable expressing themselves openly right from the start. This feeling of comfort and connection is an incredibly important building block for achieving lasting change. In her psychotherapy work, she uses humor and compassion to connect with her clients, and often finds that her sessions are filled with moments of laughter that help to balance the hard work they are doing on the issues at hand. She honors each of her client’s experiences, and takes pride in her work walking with them in their journey towards lasting positive change.

Sometimes you need a private place to be yourself where you can freely discuss your life with someone who can offer an outside perspective and help you to make the changes you are seeking. Dr. Klein excels at providing such a place for her clients: somewhere they can feel completely safe and supported in their process of growth.

Dr. Klein’s Training

Dr. Klein graduated from the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Professional Psychology with a doctorate in clinical psychology. She is a licensed Clinical Psychologist and has worked in various mental health settings including private practice, The Children’s Hospital, and community mental health in the seven years living and working here in Denver. She is especially drawn to seeing clients in private practice where she is best able to provide the care and energy needed to help them reach their goals.

About Dr. Klein

Dr. Klein grew up in various towns across the Midwest and fell in love with Denver, Colorado when she moved out here for graduate school. After completing her doctorate she found she could not leave such a great place, and instead decided to make Denver her home. She is still exploring all the outdoor activities Colorado has to offer. She has found that she loves hiking, running, backyard gatherings, and trying restaurants in the city.

 Ready to book your free consultation with Dr. Courtney Klein? Call us at 720-675-7123 or email CatalystCenterLLC@gmail.com

We Are Reading: 50 ways to Support a Woman During Labor

We love this list of ways to encourage and support a laboring woman from Four Mamas Birth Collective, www.fourmamasbirth.com. Great for partners!

1. Greet the contraction with a big sigh.…relax as you let your breath out.

2. Every breath out brings calmness…

3. That’s the way….just like that……

4. Feel baby’s head pressing down…..let the baby come.

5. Stay soft and flexible where you feel the baby….

6. Now it’s coming down……start to rest now.

7. Great! Don’t change a thing.   You’re doing so well.

8. Join right in with your breathing….keep it going in and out….

9. Nice and easy….. use only the energy you need….

10. Drop your shoulders….. loosen your hands…..

11. Stay with your breath… each one opens the cervix more…

12. This one is almost over…..fading away….. go limp like a rag doll….

13. You really have the hang of this. You’re amazing.   I knew you could do it.

14. Here comes another….that’s it, relaxing sighs as you rise up to the top of it…

15. Just give way for the baby… baby wants to come….

16. Keep it going just like that…..easy in , easy out…….keep that rhythm

17. See it happening….the baby is coming down on the inside….. breathe it open

18.You’re a natural…….working so well….a strong woman.

19. Let it go away…..start to rest…….cleansing breath…..Nice going!

20. Meet it with your breathing…. that’s it….getting stronger now…..stay with it…

21. Let it stretch….that’s the baby’s head you feel…….coming through.

22. We’re really getting there….you’re doing beautifully…..you’re inspiring!

23. It’s coming down….slow and easy breaths now…..kiss that one good-bye…..

24. First class work!

25. You’re so healthy and strong!

26. Deep breath right from the start……yes, in and out….match it to the peak…

27. Yes, really going right with it……the circle is widening…..

28. Just a little longer…here, look in my eyes….breathe with me. …just like that

29. Going away now…… go limp and relaxed……you just rest now.

30. I’m here with you, you are alright…….we’ll do this together…..one at time.

31. From the beginning….breathe with me…….yes….yes….

32. Nice and steady…..baby’s sliding through….. heading toward your arms…

33. Stay centered…..no resistance……going with it…..being fluid like water.

34. Good open sounds……going deep inside…. to where the baby is.

35. Easing up now……let it go completely……rest for you and the baby.

36. You’re incredible!   Finding that inner strength. I knew you could do this.

37. Remember, the hardest time is the shortest. Let’s take them one at a time.

38. Deep breath….really surrender……you are safe……

39. You’re the best…working hard…..really stretching…

40. Good pain, baby pain….doing just what it should…

41. OK, it’s coming down the hill…..in the valley now…..time to rest again

42. You’re fully dilated, you can push when you’re ready!

43. I’m so excited for you! You’ll be meeting your baby soon!     What a woman!

44. Few deep breaths now….push at the top of your breath…..pressing down…..

45. That’s it…..way into your bottom….feel baby moving down and out

46. Listen to your body….follow it’s rhythm….push when it tells you to…

47. It’s going away….rest and relax now…save that energy…..

48. Here it comes….feel your woman power pushing your baby down……down

49. Let the baby come out easy now….bottom opens out….blossoming petal by petal……breathe easy…..little nudges….. here it comes!

50. What a miracle! Congratulations, you’re a Mom!

If you are looking a guide to childbirth for dads and labor companions we recommend The Birth Partner by Penny Simkin.

Meet The Therapists: Kendra Doukas

Kendra Doukas, MS, LMFT

 Kendra’s Specialties:

 Approach to Healing:

Kendra is passionate about her work helping individuals, couples, and families to heal and rebuild after major losses and traumatic events. Many clients often tell her that they appreciate how warm and approachable she is, and how knowledgeable she is about ways to treat the effects of loss and trauma. Many people seek her out when they have tried therapy before and feel as though nothing has worked – her approach can benefit those who have not been helped by other forms of treatment.

Kendra believes in the connection between our minds and our bodies. She helps her clients to achieve peace and healing by utilizing mindfulness techniques and helping them to address the ways that they hold stress and tension in their bodies, especially after a traumatic event or a major physical transformation such as the birth of a child.

Kendra excels at helping her clients to achieve healing that they didn’t know was possible by blending well-researched approaches to treatment with her gentle and compassionate demeanor.

 Kendra’s Training

Kendra completed her Master’s of Science degree in Human Development and Family Studies at Colorado State University in 2009 where she focused on the principles of marriage and family therapy. She has also completed specialized additional training in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). In addition to her private practice experience, she has counseled individuals at Larimer County Community Corrections and at Crossroads Safehouse.

 About Kendra

Kendra was born and raised in the Denver area and like many folks who grow up here, she loves it far too much to leave. She enjoys traveling, but always looks forward to coming home to Colorado. After spending nearly a decade in Fort Collins to pursue her education, she decided to return to the Denver area. Her family and her often take advantage of the beautiful sights and great weather through hiking, snowboarding, and camping. As a therapist, she genuinely appreciates the health and wellness factor that is inherent in Denver’s culture.

Ready to book your free consultation with Kendra?

Call us at 720-675-7123 or email CatalystCenterLLC@gmail.com

We Are Reading: When Your Child Makes You Want To Scream: 10 Steps to Calm

These are some great ideas and reminders for parents when it comes to some of the post challenging parts of parenting from Aha! Parenting. Dr. Laura Markham shares that there a couple of ways to respond when your children are behaving in ways that make you want to scream.

You can:

a. Scream and then feel remorseful later.

b. Resist screaming by calming yourself down.

In other words, you can escalate the upset, or you can try to stay calm to settle everyone down.

Of course, you have more options if you take positive action BEFORE you feel like screaming.  Often when we lose it with our children, it’s because we haven’t set a limit, and something is grating on us.  Some parents are trying so hard to be patient they let things get out of hand, and then snap.

The key is to set limits BEFORE you get angry.  The minute you start getting annoyed, it’s a signal to do something. No, not yell. It’s time to intervene in a positive way to meet everyone’s needs, including your own!

The full post breaks down 10 steps that seem really do-able if you commit to them.

Read the full post here:

http://www.ahaparenting.com/_blog/Parenting_Blog/post/When_Your_Child_Makes_You_Want_To_Scream

Meet The Therapists: Dr. Katie Godfrey

Katie Godfrey, PhD, LMFT

 Approach to Healing:

Warm, Genuine, Safe, and Empowering

Dr. Godfrey excels at building meaningful connections with her clients as they work together towards growth and healing. She is passionate about creating a warm, non-judgmental environment where her clients can experience being deeply cared for as they work together to transform their lives. In her over ten years of clinical experience her clients have often told her that they value how genuine she is with them, and appreciates how she balances challenging them to grow with supporting them. She has a gift for connecting with people who feel no one can connect with them, and helping them grow new connections with others in their lives. She work with clients on a wide variety of issues, and has specialized training in several areas of expertise including helping her clients heal from trauma with EMDR and treating postpartum depression and anxiety.

 Dr. Godfrey’s Training

Dr. Godfrey completed her Master’s of Science degree in Human Development and Family Studies with a concentration in Marriage and Family Therapy at Colorado State University in 2005. Her Ph.D. is in Educational and Human Resource Studies with a concentration in Couple and Family Therapy. This was completed at Colorado State University in 2010. Additionally, she has a Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies. She has also completed specialized training in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) and Perinatal Mood Disorders. Prior to joining The Catalyst Center, she worked at Crossroads Safehouse and had a private practice in Fort Collins, CO since 2004.

About Dr. Godfrey

Dr. Godfrey was born and raised in Savannah, GA, where she still visits annually to have some ocean and family time. After high school she moved to the mountains of North Carolina to attend college at Appalachian State University. There she was able to pursue many outdoor activities and completed The Appalachian Trail after graduation, a 2,140 mile backpacking journey from Georgia to Maine. She then moved to Fort Collins, CO, where she completed her graduate training and worked for many years. She is new to the Denver area where she now lives with her partner and children. She spends a good deal of time camping, hiking, and enjoying all of the activities Denver has to offer.

Ready to book your free consultation with Dr. Katie Godfrey? Call us at 720-675-7123 or email  CatalystCenterLLC@gmail.com

We Are Reading: How To Keep Jealousy And Envy From Ruining Your Life

Amanda L Chan from the Huffington Post wrote a great article about the impact jealousy and envy can have in our lives. She shares that although we are all likely to experience jealousy and envy in different setting in our lives, we can find ways to keep them from affecting our day to day lives. Another interesting point she made is to recognize the difference between jealously and envy.

While most people use the words “jealousy” and “envy” interchangeably, they’re actually two distinct emotions. Jealousy is solicited anytime there is a threat to something that is of value to an individual (in other words, it’s that icky feeling you get when you are afraid something will be taken away from you). Envy, on the other hand, is the emotion solicited when somebody has something that you want for yourself.

The author also made some important ties between jealousy and self-esteem. Additionally she discusses how envy is related to competitiveness.

Since jealousy and self-esteem seem to be so related, focusing on your positive attributes can help to boost the latter, Valdesolo says. It all has to do with a term in psychology: the “working self-concept.” This is the idea that there are many ways to define yourself — for instance, you can be a father, a professor and a soccer player, all at once — but you’re not always going to be working all of these aspects of yourself at one time.

Competitiveness seems to be highly related to envy, though it’s still not known which causes the other. “It can be that competitive people are more successful because of their envy, which drives them to succeed, or it can be that because they’re envious, they are considered to be competitive,” Cohen-Charash says.

What we found most meaningful in the article was how the discussion turns to focus on how jealousy and envy can impact our relationship. The article includes some thoughts on how to find healthy ways to address the envy and jealousy in our own lives.

Check out the full article at:

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/5186248/?ir=Parents